Healthy Homes

 Sleeping  |  Curtains  |  Heating  |  Condensation  |  Windows  |  Steam   Draughts  |  Mould  |  Washing

 

Winter can be a challenging time, here we share some tips for making your home warmer and drier during those winter months. 

Sleeping

This first clip shares tips about sleeping arrangements and avoiding spreading germs by creating as much space as possible between the heads of sleeping children.

Source: Ministry of Health

Curtains

Open your curtains during the day to allow the natural (and free) energy of the sun to heat your home and then close your curtains at night to help keep the the warm air in and the cold out. If you use something different to cover your windows like sheets or lava-lava, make sure fit snugly around the window frame. 

Source: Ministry of Health

Heating

Check you have the best heating option for your home. Portable gas heaters, for example, are expensive to run, cause dampness and give out dangerous fumes. Picking the right heating option can keep your home warmer and save you money. 

Source: Ministry of Health

Condensation

Some homes look like they’re drowning during winter with the condensation they collect. Aside from looking a bit horrible, it can make your homes feel damp and cause mould to grow.

Wipe off any water that has collected (condensation) on walls and on the inside of windows. If you do, you’ll find your home is drier as well as being easier and cheaper to heat – you’ll also lower the chances of mould growing in your home. 

Source: Ministry of Health

Windows

Open your windows to get some fresh air flowing through your home each day, for at least a 20 minutes on fine days and a few minutes in winter. Fresh air in the home helps to keep your home drier. 

Source: Ministry of Health

Steam

Use kitchen and bathroom extractor fans if you have them. If you don’t, open your kitchen windows when you cook, as well as the windows in your bathroom when you shower or take a bath, to let to steam out. 

Source: Ministry of Health

Draughts

Stop cold air getting into your home by stopping draughts around doors, windows and fireplaces. Draught stoppers are perfect for this but simply rolling up an old dry towel will work just as well.

Source: Ministry of Health

Mould

Mould grows in damp and wet places and as well as not being the best look, it can affect your family’s health. If mould shows up in your home, you can remove it with bleach or white vinegar from your ceilings and walls.

Source: Ministry of Health

Washing

The drier your home is the easier it is to heat so try your best dry your washing outside, in the garage or carport.

Source: Ministry of Health

 

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